Year of the Tiger 2022

Will your zoo pledge to make a financial contribution to WildCats for wild tigers and Amur leopards during Year of the Tiger?

Year of the Tiger

In honour of Year of the Tiger in the lunar calendar which begins on February 1st, WildCats Conservation Alliance is launching a yearlong campaign celebrating the survival of this charismatic species. With brands already exploiting the celebration for commercial use, we are determined to keep conservation of this majestic species at the top of the agenda. Help us keep wild tigers as the beating heart of the forest by loudly and proudly advocating for the continued conservation of wild tigers and their habitats during this significant year.

Year of the Tiger starts on 1 February 2022 and lasts until 21 January 2023 giving you the perfect opportunity to engage visitors on how the wild tiger is a crucial component of Asian landscapes and biodiversity.

Download your free Year of the Tiger resources

We have put together a handy resource pack to help you join the conversation. From posters and flyers to social media templates, this pack has links to everything you will need. If you require any bespoke resources like translations we are happy to assist, please reach out to us via email – [email protected] We have posters and leaflets available in German, French and Italian.

Make sure to share your Year of the Tiger activities with us! You can tag WildCats on social media and reach out via email.

#yearofthetiger22 #tigerguardians

Download your pack

Stay up to date with our podcast series

Join us on this monumental year for tiger conservation as we delve into topical issues affecting the preservation of this majestic species. In each episode, we meet with experts working on the front line to save wild tigers and take a deeper dive into the threats and solutions they face on their quest to protect tigers and their habitats.

Hosted by WildCats science communicator, Amy van Gelder, this podcast can be found wherever you get your podcasts from. Make sure to subscribe to WildCats Pawcast so that you don’t miss an episode.

Tigers have made their own case for survival, they’ve earned their stripes, now join us to celebrate them in Year of the Tiger.

Download the pawcast

Find out more about Year of the Tiger

On the last Year of the Tiger in 2010, leaders of the 13 tiger range countries (TRC’s) assembled at an International Tiger Summit to set out the Global Tiger Recovery Program. They set themselves the challenge of doubling the number of wild tigers across their geographical area by the next Year of the Tiger. The Global Tiger Recovery Programme represented the last best hope for the survival of the world’s most magnificent species and the valuable landscapes in which wild tigers live.

Year of the Tiger - Tiger range countries

GTRP actions

  • Effectively manage, preserve, protect, and enhance tiger habitats;
  • Eradicate poaching, smuggling, and illegal trade of tigers, their parts, and derivatives;
  • Cooperate in transboundary landscape management and in combating illegal trade
  • Engage with indigenous and local communities;
  • Increase the effectiveness of tiger and habitat management;
  • Restore tigers to their former range.

China wildlife monitoring - Year of the Tiger

Read the recovery programme

The foundation of the recovery programme is 13 individual National Tiger Recovery Priorities (NTRPs) that outline the urgent priority activities each country will take to contribute to the global goal. Find out more in the full document.

Find out more

Year of the Tiger - Global Tiger Recovery Program

The 13 Tiger Range Countries

The Global Tiger Recovery Program seeks to empower these countries to address all domestic and transboundary threats to tigers.

The Global Tiger Recovery Programme (GTRP) was developed in 2010, with the shared goal of solving the tiger crisis by 2022 through actions to:

  • Effectively manage, preserve, protect, and enhance tiger habitats;
  • Eradicate poaching, smuggling, and illegal trade of tigers, their parts, and derivatives;
  • Cooperate in transboundary landscape management and in combating illegal trade
  • Engage with indigenous and local communities;
  • Increase the effectiveness of tiger and habitat management;
  • Restore tigers to their former range.
China wildlife monitoring

Full version of the GTRP

The foundation of the recovery programme is 13 individual National Tiger Recovery Priorities (NTRPs) that outline the urgent priority activities each country will take to contribute to the global goal. Find out more in the full document.

Read more

What about Amur leopards?

Numbering less than 100 individuals, Amur leopards are the world’s most endangered big cat and you can still donate directly to their conservation during Year of the Tiger. Amur leopards also share an overlapping range with Amur tigers so by supporting the conservation of one of these charismatic species you are directly helping the other.