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Technology & Collaboration Saves Tigers in Nepal

By 21st May 2024May 29th, 2024Blog, ZSL Nepal
  • Parsa National Park (PNP) in Nepal is home to an estimated 41 tigers.
  • An ambitious project, carried out by The Zoological Society of London (ZSL) and funded by WildCats Conservation Alliance, aims to bolster tiger conservation efforts in PNP.
  • The project’s success underscores the importance of collaborative efforts, technological innovation, and community engagement in conserving endangered species.

Parsa National Park (PNP), situated in the central Terai Arc Landscape in Nepal — an area of global importance for tiger conservation — is vital for safeguarding the endangered tiger population. Spanning roughly 535 square kilometres, the park is home to an estimated 41 tigers, as reported in the 2022 National Tiger Survey.

Within this National Park an ambitious project, carried out by The Zoological Society of London (ZSL) and funded by WildCats Conservation Alliance, aims to bolster tiger conservation efforts through strategic partnerships, community engagement, and cutting-edge technology.

2023 Project Highlights

Strengthening Collaboration:

The project successfully facilitated improved collaboration between multiple conservation stakeholders, including the Divisional Forest Office (DFO), park authorities, and local communities. This collaboration was vital for the conservation of tigers moving from PNP to the adjoining forests.

Community Engagement and Awareness:

Five community-level workshops engaged 304 participants, including local residents and community leaders. These workshops disseminated findings from the National Tiger Survey and promoted strategies for human-tiger coexistence.

FirstAidkits23©DNP_ZSL

Technological Innovations:

The deployment of GSM-enabled camera technology in core tiger habitats has been a game-changer.  These cameras provide real-time monitoring through the Global System for Mobile communication thus not needing an internet connection. This technology can monitor tiger movement but can also be used in poacher cameras helping to identify and mitigate threats to tigers and their prey. Regular deployment of 20 poacher cameras led to the successful apprehension of illegal loggers and poachers. Park authorities received training to ensure the sustainability of this technology beyond the project period.

Enhanced Law Enforcement:

Training sessions equipped 40 park staff with the skills needed to deploy and manage GSM-enabled cameras and respond to real-time monitoring alerts significantly strengthening the capacity to control illegal wildlife activities. In May, covertly installed cameras captured images of illegal loggers. Prompt action by park authorities and the Nepal Army led to the seizure of timber and the arrest of offenders. In June, a poacher was arrested within an hour of being detected by a SpyCam and in August, real-time alerts from SpyCams led to the arrest of three individuals involved in illegal logging activities.

To enhance operational efficiency, the project also provided essential equipment such as desktop computers, first aid kits, searchlights, and tents for long-range patrols. These resources have improved the ability of park staff and the Nepal Army to respond swiftly to wildlife crime.

ZSL Nepal team demonstrating camera trap deployment

The project’s success underscores the importance of collaborative efforts, technological innovation, and community engagement in conserving endangered species. With continued support and dedication, Parsa National Park is on a promising path to securing a safe and thriving habitat for tigers.

For more detailed information about the project and its outcomes, visit our Nepal project page.

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